Criminology Intervention

Criminology Intervention (310.B1)

PROGRAM PLANNER FOR FALL 2023 OR LATER The following planner indicates all the courses needed and the usual path to complete your DEC in this program.

** Courses taken by some students may need to be adjusted due to recent changes brought to the “Charte de la langue française” by Bill 96. **
*Pending approval, detailed course descriptions will be on the site once approved by the committees.

  • Students who require a mise à niveau English or French course will be required to pass it before they can take their introductory course in English or French.
  • Students will be required to pass a Ministerial Exam of Language of Instruction and a Program Comprehensive Assessment in Criminology Intervention.
ENGLISH | 603-101-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete four (4) English courses to obtain their DEC. Courses 603-102 and 603-103 may be taken in either order only after successfully completing 603-101. Course 603-200-MQ is the 4th and last English course required. Click here to view courses list.

HUMANITIES | 345-1xx-MQ

Students need three (3) Humanities courses to complete their DEC. Courses 345-101-MQ and 345-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 345-21_-AB. Click here to view courses list. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION | 109-1xx-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete three (3) Physical Education courses to complete their DEC. Courses 109-101-MQ and 109-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 109-103-MQ. Click here to view courses list. 

COMPLEMENTARY COURSE

Complementary courses provide an opportunity for students to explore subjects outside their field of concentration and are offered in six different areas. Except for Liberal Arts, Arts & Sciences and Double DEC programs, students must take two (2) complementary courses as part of their General Education requirement.
Students are encouraged to select courses from subjects that are outside their program of study;
Students can take a course from each ensemble of the same domain;
Or
Students can take a course from either ensemble of two different domains;
Or
Students can take a course from the same ensemble of two different domains;
Domain 1, Domain 2, Domain 3 , Domain 4 , Domain 5 and Domain 6

Click here to view courses list. 

Diversity and Inclusivity in Interventions | 310-106-AB

Individuals from racialized, First Nations, Inuit and Metis communities, and impoverished backgrounds are overrepresented in many institutions such as the child welfare and correctional systems. These individuals are often marginalized in society and excluded from supports. The purpose of this course is to increase student knowledge of the challenges faced by individuals from racialized and impoverished backgrounds including interaction with authority and social and legal inequalities. This course will also address the challenges faced by LGBTQIA2+ individuals when encountering child welfare and correctional systems. Students will understand their clients’ environment and impacts of that environment on the behaviour and choices they make. The repercussions of these inequalities will be examined. The course will examine the professionals, correctional and social systems’ roles in the face of these challenges. A focus will be on how students can use this knowledge to plan interventions they make when working in the field.

The Impact of Lifespan Development on Delinquency and Victimization | 310-107-AB

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the development of individuals from childhood to adulthood including cognitive, behavioural, moral and sexual development. The course will look at how transitional stages and environmental factors play a role in marginalized behaviours or victimization.

Introduction to Criminology | 310-108-AB

In this course, students will be introduced to the historical elements of criminology such as the classical period, penitentiary reform movement, first scientific studies, Italian positivist school and other studies at the turn of the century. Criminology will be examined as a discipline including the different definitions, conceptions, and notions of crime and deviance. Social problems and social control will also be explored as well as the functioning of the criminal justice system, crime statistics and as well as the role of the Criminologist. Students will learn the different ways crimes are measured as well as the medias’ representation. The main criminological perspectives on crime and justice are investigated to understand why people commit crime and how society reacts to crime. Crime is examined in relation to gender, age, class, and ethnicity.

Observation Methods | 310-109-AB

Observing your surroundings is a skill that must be acquired and mastered in order to be efficient in performing your duties in any setting. This course is designed to enable students to begin to acquire the skills to effectively observe individuals in various surroundings and circumstances and to be able to share and document their observations. The course will focus on understanding what observation is, determining an objective when observing and determining an appropriate method of observation. Students will learn how to effectively document observations and how to use observation to inform and assess clients and situations.


  • Students who require a mise à niveau English or French course will be required to pass it before they can take their introductory course in English or French.
  • Students will be required to pass a Ministerial Exam of Language of Instruction and a Program Comprehensive Assessment in Criminology Intervention.
ENGLISH | 603-1xx-MQ

After successfully completing their 603-101 course, students may choose to take either a 603-102 or a 603-103 course. Click here to view courses list.

HUMANITIES | 345-1xx-MQ

Students need three (3) Humanities courses to complete their DEC. Courses 345-101-MQ and 345-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 345-21_-AB. Click here to view courses list. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION | 109-1xx-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete three (3) Physical Education courses to complete their DEC. Courses 109-101-MQ and 109-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 109-103-MQ. Click here to view courses list. 

Communication Techniques | 310-206-AB

The goal of this course is to develop appropriate communication skills and to be able to effectively conduct interviews. Students will learn to identify the nature of elements of the process of communication and will learn how to apply the appropriate techniques of communication depending on the situation. They will also learn how to clearly and precisely express their thoughts and feelings and to identify and develop professional attitude and language to facilitate the communication process. Students will learn how to apply communication strategies when dealing with difficult situations or topics. These interventions may be done in person, on the telephone or online.

Introduction to the Profession | 310-207-AB

In this course, students will have the unique opportunity to practice their observation skills and be an observer in a variety of professional settings, which will help define their career goals. Students will be introduced to the many varied occupations in the profession, both in institutional and community networks. They will gain an understanding of the functions of intervention workers in a variety of organizations with particular attention being given to the skills and behaviour necessary to function in each job. Students will also gain knowledge of laws that mandate settings (YPA, YCJA, CCRA, ARHSS, etc.). This introduction to the varied occupations and laws will allow the students to begin to acquire an understanding of the delinquency phenomenon.

Juvenile Criminology | 310-208-AB

In this course, students will learn the concepts of ‘youth’ and ‘crime’ and the shifting meanings attached to these terms, as well as exploring the extent and nature of youth offending. They will also identify and understand youths in situations of exclusion and social disaffiliation. Students will also learn to recognize signs for marginalized and delinquent behaviour. Students will be called upon to critically examine some of the major theoretical explanations of youth crime i.e. developmental and life course perspectives, positivist approaches, radical and realist perspectives and (sub)-cultural theory. This includes developing an understanding of some of the ways that youth crime is manifested in society, with a focus on trends such as gangs, drugs and anti-social behaviour, as well as the victimisation of young people. They will also better understand risk and protective factors, as well as the influence criminogenic factors have on a youth. Finally, students will study the impact of delinquent behaviour on families and communities and the role of the youth justice system in particular (welfare, justice, punitiveness, diversion, prevention).

Understanding Penal Law and its Impact | 310-213-AB

In this course, students will learn to recognize and understand different crimes, to correctly identify sentences pertaining to crimes. They will also learn about the functioning of the judicial system, how to prepare testimony and the importance and relevance of recording information. They will study types of police interventions and their impacts on people as well as conditions pertaining to Court orders, consequences of a judicial decision (court decision) as well as the impact of administrative court decisions. Other subjects such as the politics of law and order; the role of the Police; the role of the courts; the purpose of punishment will also be explored. Finally, students will also learn about the creation and enforcement of law, community sanctions, probation, life post-punishment (parole), with a special emphasis on restorative justice.

Security and Work Ethics | 350-214-AB

In this course, students will learn personal and physical security through appropriate intervention techniques while respecting procedures and protocols in place. They will also study proper documentation and the importance of communication and teamwork in various settings. Students will learn how to prevent and manage conflicts, good work ethics pertaining to security interventions as well as to establish good partnerships with outside resources and professionals. The importance of mental stamina in this field will also be discussed.


  • Students who require a mise à niveau English or French course will be required to pass it before they can take their introductory course in English or French.
  • Students will be required to pass a Ministerial Exam of Language of Instruction and a Program Comprehensive Assessment in Criminology Intervention.
ENGLISH | 603-1xx-MQ
After successfully completing their 603-101 course, students may choose to take either a 603-102 or a 603-103 course. Click here to view courses list. 
FRENCH | 602-1xx-MQ

Every student needs one of each of the Block “A” and Block “B” courses in order to complete their DEC. For each block, there are four levels of courses: Level 1 , Level 2 , Level 3 and Level 4.
Placement in the appropriate level of French is determined by the students’ high school marks. The French Department reserves the right to change the placement of a student upon written notice. Students take the Block “B” course at the same level as the Block “A” course.
If placement determines that students do not have a college level of proficiency in French, students may be required to take remedial courses to upgrade their knowledge of the language. Click here to view courses list.

HUMANITIES | 345-2xx-MQ

Students need three (3) Humanities courses to complete their DEC. Courses 345-101-MQ and 345-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 345-21_-AB. Click here to view courses list. 

Examining the Profession | 310-306-AB

This continuation of the course Introduction to the Profession from the previous semester will have the students visiting additional settings (in small groups) and also possible resources that they might offer to their clients. For settings where students are not able to visit, guest speakers will attend the classroom. When students are not visiting settings or listening to guest speakers, class time will focus on continuing to examine the important aspects of being a professional in the field including professional ethics and development of empathy. Students will also learn about different community resources and the referral process.

Self-Defense | 310-307-AB

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to both protect themselves and address potentially violent situations. Through this course students will learn the fundamentals of self defense as they pertain to probable contexts for workers in a variety of settings. They will learn the basics of threat identification, conflict de-escalation and verbal resolution strategies. Basic protective skills, including shielding, evasion, disengaging from holds and pins will be introduced with emphasis on the avoidance of and disengagement from violence at all costs. Students will also learn basic First Aid as it pertains to common defensive situations.

Intervention and Counselling Techniques I | 310-308-AB

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to various counselling and intervention theories and techniques that they could use with their clients. This course will provide the student with a comprehensive understanding of the various theories and clinical approaches used in the treatment of troubled youths and adult offenders. They will learn to critically compare the different approaches as well as understand their applications and limitations. Students will examine the limits of their professional roles.

Understanding the Victim | 310-313-AB

In this course, students will learn to understand what a victim is and the impact of victimization on a person. They will be called upon to examine a victim’s situation and to recognize the victimization process and secondary victimization. Students will study the progression of a legal file. Students will come to understand individual as well as social and judicial consequences of victimization. As well, victims’ needs will also be addressed in this course.

Adult Criminology | 310-314-AB

In this course, students will learn to identify and understand adults in situations of exclusion and social disaffiliation. They will study the root causes of it and its consequences. Students will also learn to recognize signs for marginalized and delinquent behaviour in adults. They will also better understand risk and protective factors, as well as the influence criminogenic factors have on an adult. Forms of crime will be presented, this can include topical examples such as terrorism, sex crime, drugs, and organised crime. Finally, students will study the impact of delinquent behaviour on families and communities.


  • Students who require a mise à niveau English or French course will be required to pass it before they can take their introductory course in English or French.
  • Students will be required to pass a Ministerial Exam of Language of Instruction and a Program Comprehensive Assessment in Criminology Intervention.
ENGLISH | 603-200-AB

After successfully completing their 603-102 and 603-103 courses, students must choose a 603-200 course. Click here to view courses list. 

FRENCH | 602-2xx-AB

Every student needs one of each of the Block “A” and Block “B” courses in order to complete their DEC. For each block, there are four levels of courses: Level 1 , Level 2 , Level 3 and Level 4.
Placement in the appropriate level of French is determined by the students’ high school marks. The French Department reserves the right to change the placement of a student upon written notice. Students take the Block “B” course at the same level as the Block “A” course.
If placement determines that students do not have a college level of proficiency in French, students may be required to take remedial courses to upgrade their knowledge of the language. Click here to view courses list. 

COMPLEMENTARY COURSE

Complementary courses provide an opportunity for students to explore subjects outside their field of concentration and are offered in six different areas. Except for Liberal Arts, Arts & Sciences and Double DEC programs, students must take two (2) complementary courses as part of their General Education requirement.
Students are encouraged to select courses from subjects that are outside their program of study;
Students can take a course from each ensemble of the same domain;
Or
Students can take a course from either ensemble of two different domains;
Or
Students can take a course from the same ensemble of two different domains;
Domain 1, Domain 2, Domain 3 , Domain 4 , Domain 5 and Domain 6

Click here to view courses list. 

Intervention and Counselling Techniques 2 | 310-405-AB

This is a continuation of the Intervention and Counselling Techniques 1. The focus of this course is the application of the clinical theories and approaches covered in the previous course. Students will learn to integrate and apply these theories into practical and essential clinical skills, thereby preparing them to directly intervene with youths and adults in difficulty as well as offenders.

Facilitating Groups | 310-406-AB

The objective is for students to develop skills necessary to plan, conduct and evaluate a group intervention with various client populations. Skills covered include:

  • identifying and prioritizing needs
  • determining the goal of the group intervention
  • identifying appropriate animation activities
  • practice of various animation activities
  • developing a plan for evaluation of the group intervention.

As part of the course, students will work together in small groups to plan a group session. Student will have the opportunity to practice animation activities they have designed.

Self-Care | 310-407-AB

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to be able to maintain their psychological wellbeing while working in the field. The course will focus on concepts such as compassion fatigue, vicarious trauma and burnout and look at a variety of coping strategies including relaxation techniques. Students will develop a personalized self-care plan for themselves. Students will develop strategies to deal with adverse outcomes.

Helping a Victim | 310-409-AB

In this course, students will determine the right interventions to use as well as to hold meetings and assist victims throughout the legal process and recovery. This will include best practice to help victims navigate through the legal system and access available resources. Students will also have to implement an appropriate intervention adapted to a victim and evaluate the effectiveness of their intervention.

Crisis Intervention | 310-410-AB

Students will practice how to effectively intervene and manage crisis situations. The aim of the course is to increase student’s knowledge and confidence in dealing with potentially critical situations. Students will first study the indicators that can characterize a crisis, a crisis-prone person and the events that can precipitate a crisis. Procedures for an effective crisis intervention will then be considered.


  • Students who require a mise à niveau English or French course will be required to pass it before they can take their introductory course in English or French.
  • Students will be required to pass a Ministerial Exam of Language of Instruction and a Program Comprehensive Assessment in Criminology Intervention.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION | 109-103-MQ

Students are required to successfully complete three (3) Physical Education courses to complete their DEC. Courses 109-101-MQ and 109-102-MQ may be taken in either order, but both must be successfully completed before registering in 109-103-MQ. Click here to view courses list. 

Mental Health Intervention | 310-509-AB

Through this course, the student will learn to distinguish the characteristic symptoms of various types of mental disorders. They will gain an understanding of the link between mental disorders and criminality and learn appropriate means for intervening with an individual who is displaying a mental disorder.

In this course, students will be expected to develop an intervention plan based on a case scenario of a client with a mental health disorder. The intervention plan will include identification and prioritization of needs, identification of observable and measurable objectives to address the need and determining the most appropriate intervention strategies to achieve the objectives.

Interventions in Residential Settings | 310-516-AB

Graduates often work with either youth or adult clients in residential settings (penitentiary, drug rehabs, youth settings, etc.). This course will focus on the day-to-day work and interventions unique to these types of settings. This will include program planning and activity-based interventions. Students will also look at the development of intervention plans and discharge planning, both of which include interventions with family and other supports as well as accessing resources in the community. Differences between working with youth versus adult populations will be highlighted in addition to the impact of various settings. As part of the course requirements, students will develop intervention plans geared towards both youth and adult settings.

Understanding and Intervening in Addiction | 310-517-AB

Students will learn how to identify the factors underlying heavy drinking, substance abuse, pathological gambling and online addiction by individuals. The extent of drug use and the links between substance abuse and delinquency will also be examined. Students will learn to recognize psychotropic substances, detect signs of drug use, identify symptoms of intoxication and assess an individual’s use of psychotropic substances. They will also make links between a person’s addiction and their personal situation as well as to identify the repercussion of their dependence. Students will need to assess and use proper intervention techniques.

Fieldwork I – Practical | 310-518-AB

There are two Fieldwork courses in the 5th semester, a course focused on practice and a course focused on theory. In Fieldwork I Practical, students will complete a 16 hour a week stage in a setting relevant to the program.

Fieldwork I – Theoretical | 310-519-AB

This is the theoretical component of Fieldwork I which consists of 3 hours a week, in class, and will address common issues encountered in the field, as well as applications of concepts learned in previous courses.

As part of this course, students will develop a prevention intervention relevant to their field placement. Students will also reflect on teamwork, managing a client’s file while considering rules and procedures as well as professional ethics.


  • Students who require a mise à niveau English or French course will be required to pass it before they can take their introductory course in English or French.
  • Students will be required to pass a Ministerial Exam of Language of Instruction and a Program Comprehensive Assessment in Criminology Intervention.
Fieldwork 2 – Practical | 310-606-AB

This course is a continuation of Fieldwork 1. Students now have a practical component of 32 hours a week stage. As part of Fieldwork II, students are immersed and engaged and are expected to be part of the daily activities of their stage as well as communicating and collaborating with other staff.

Fieldwork 2 – Theoretical | 310-607-AB

This course is a continuation of Fieldwork I in the previous semester. As in the previous semester, there are two Fieldwork courses focused on practice and a course focused on theory. This course is a continuation of Fieldwork 1. Students now have a practical component of 32 hours a week stage and three hours of theory in class which will address common issues encountered in the field, as well as applications of concepts learned in previous courses.

As part of the course students will be required to plan, carry out, and evaluate an intervention at their stage. Students may use interventions developed in other courses. As part of Fieldwork II, students are immersed and engaged and are expected to be part of the daily activities of their stage as well as communicating and collaborating with other staff.


back Skip to content